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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
in child labor laws? is he against the civil rights bill for public accommodations where you can't close your bathrooms to black people? what kind of laws is this guy for? apparently nothing. >> well, i think that you're probably onto something there, but the notion -- >> it sounds like his principle is don't mess with business on anything. >> i think that the notion that it would be -- that it is interfering with someone's freedom to say to them you can't discriminate against someone that is doing the same work just because they're a woman. you know, we've had an outpouring of support in the last 48 hours. claire mccaskill.com, people are coming there and they're really jazzed up about this notion that i was -- that i'm not ladylike. i am a fater, chris. i'm proud to be a fighter for missouri families and there's a lot at stake in this election and believe me, it's not over. missouri will be tough, this will be close. >> did you ever have a defense attorney say to you when you're putting a bad guy in prison, you're not being ladylike there? you just did your job. this is not a hard one
. >>> today also marks a milestone in the civil right movement. half a century ago james meredith confronted racism head on. >> that's right. he was the first african american student at ole miss and tonight the campus is marking the day with an anniversary celebration, but as randall pinkston reports, meredith himself remains a reluctant hero. >> reporter: students gathered in tribute on the campus where james meredith made history. >> i know i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for him. >> i'm proud to attend this school. >> reporter: 50 years ago meredith was the first african american student to attend university of mississippi. his trouble became a flash point in the civil rights movement. a defiant governor ross barnett repeatedly blocked him from enrolling and angry mobs rioted in the streets, but on october 1st, 1962, meredith attended his first classes at ole miss. today he remains a reluctant hero. >> for 50 years people have been thanking me, congratulating me. it wasn't james meredith. it was god all the time. >> reporter: after meredith mississippi gradually desegregated all of it
pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program "democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr
. >>> and the supreme court is back with some big decisions on civil rights that are coming up. a supreme choice is 36 days away. stay with us. [ mother bear ] you're not using too much are you, hon? [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is so soft you'll have to remind your family they can use less. it's made with extra cushions that are soft and more absorbent. plus you can use four times less. charmin ultra soft. why does my mouth feel dryer than i remember it to be? there are more people taking more medication, so we see people suffering from dry mouth more so. we may see more cavities, bad breath, oral irritation. a dry mouth sufferer doesn't have to suffer. i would recommend biotene. the enzymes in biotene products help supplement enzymes that are naturally in saliva. biotene helps moisten those areas that have become dry. those that are suffering can certainly benefit from biotene. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>>
-- glaucoma. -- . >>> action two civil rights attorneys are taking to force the federal government to take control of the oakland police department. >>> as we've been telling you from fleet week not playoffs to justin bieber live with what you need to know to get around a jam-packed weekend in the bay area. [ female announcer ] introducing yoplait greek 100. 100% new. ♪ 100% greek. 100% mmm... ♪ oh wow, that is mmm... ♪ in fact it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. well ok then, new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. ♪
was going on. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people today that don't know the history. have no clue about the history of civil rights. and here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi, they were protesting on the grounds, they did not want james meredith there. and your father was talking to the governor about that. >> you got to get order there. how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the streets? he may step out of that building and something happen to him. i can't remove him under those conditions. let's get order up there. we've got to get somebody up there now to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. but first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know that tone of voice from my aunts and uncles. i think that civil rights really went from being an important but not heated issue at the very beginning of his presidency to
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
thought stood out. great tape about the civil rights school integration stuff, call with president eisenhower talking about the cuban missile crisis. this was really interesting. kennedy on the optics of sort of being president and how the gop would seize on a photo op and try to take it out of context which doesn't seem like something you would be considering way back in the '60s. let's hear that tape. >> so apparently just as bad even back then. >> i think it was bad back then. there's this tendency to say it's worse than it's ever been. when you look at history all the way back to the founding you realize people were getting beat in the head with kaines on the senate floor and it's always been bad. that said i think kennedy was particularly astute when it came to optics and concerned with it. he was the first modern president in that regard, the one that came of age and owed his exe -- election to some extent to television. he was seeing it as a stage that had to be set and you see that reflected in those comments. >> now we don't need microphones. we just need juicy tell-all --
, this civil rights attorney told kron 4 haazig madyun that this could raise some serious questions. >> this officer pointed the firearm and he heard 3-4 different gun shots. >> there is conflict in the testimony that the state was given. >> the oakland police department has released the crime report of 18 year-old bluuferd, the statement from the witnesses of the scene are raising red flags. >> on the on september statements that there was gunfire. perhaps that the 18 year-old fired gunfire however the evidence shows that there's no gunshots fired. and that the gun found near him was not fired. whoever made that statement has been quoted wrong. >> and obviously the fact is that he was not on probation. that probably prompte him to run however, what the family has gone through that he and anny would have pointed a fire arm at an officer. at a time like this. when he said that he has not done anything. in any got shot. >> in oakland haazig madyun kron 4. >>pam: half t statement released with a crime report that " this release is not intended to address all questions and criticisms th
an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to close is carried if i were also a candidate, i want to talk about the solution to the civil problem be to invest in kids. it is difficult to solve this problem without an economy that is doing better. one of
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
and demagoguery of the 70's and 80's. the real civil rights battles were over, and then obama brings it all back. gerri: maybe i'm just my youth, but i really believe that having obama as president, as a black american would bring us together, would make things better, would help us feel this issue, moved beyond it, but it has only gotten worse. >> that is why my book is for you because a lot of americans thought that. more white americans voted for obama in 2008 and had voted for any democrat for president in nearly 40 years. obviously a lot of people and that hope. i think seeing him do it himself is what is so arresting about this video, but usually it is being pushed by white liberals. if you don't go for obama america is racist. that statement by romney. and they do it -- they don't care about the historic nature. otherwise they would have been supporting clarence thomas' nomination to the supreme court. they like him because he is the most left-wing president we have ever had, and they can defend his liberal policies by calling his opponents and critics racist >> i want to read the respons
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
to me from his cowriting the motion. shannon has legal standing because of a civil rights lawsuit he won a decade ago in the so-called riders case. that led to federal monitoring of the department and court- ordered changes he says never came. >> we simply can't wait any longer. that's why we're acting now. >> reporter: he'll file the 50- page brief plus exhibits tomorrow. the motion is scheduled for a hearing in mid december where the city of oakland is expected to fight the request. the latest in the long battle getting to this point is the monitor's just released report, criticizing the department's handling in nine police officer shootings. three of them were fatal. and it warned that some officers might face sanctions. >> i've done police shootings in many cities. but the problems with oakland are systemic and unique. >> reporter: no one from the police department responded to my request for comment today. but chief howard jordan posted this letter to the community. it says when officers fire a weapon, jordan trusts they will act professionally, ethically and with knowledge of the a
partly of my life who was a civil rights leader, clarence jones. he was martin luther king jr.'s lawyer. obama reminds me of growing up a little bit with this man because he was in the business world. he was in the political world and he had to keep a certain demeanor. he was successful, so he moved up to a fancy neighborhood in the bronx, believe it or not there was one back then in riverdale, and he would go jogging every morning. every single morning he was stopped by the police. this was 1960--1970. he always managed to keep an integrity about him. and a dignity about him. i think he had to do that out of political necessity. out of survival. that article in the atlantic talked about whether obama has the freedom to react like he would really emotionally want to react. i don't know. what do you think about that? we all want him to just deck him. we all want him to roll up his sleeves and deal with the lies head on and say i'm sorry, are you talking to me? you know what i mean? and just walk over and go, look me in the eye and say that again, pal, because i got some things i'm going
understand how we can be relevant to their daily lives. >> reporter: there are first lady dresses, civil rights landmark and even new democratic party friendly frogs. >> we operate space telescopes for nasa. we are on the cutting edge of discovering new black holes, of understand the basis for dark matter, discover is new planets. >> reporter: whether you are a kindergartener or a ph dmplet candidate, they hope you'll find something at a new web site. -- or a ph.d. candidate, they hope you'll find something at a new web site. >> it is integrated with the way they live every day. >> they hope you will agree that it is seriously amazing. >> one of the big attractions is going away for a short time. dorothy's ruby slippers, the ones that actress judy garland wore in the wizard of oz. they are being loaned to the albert museum in london. london officials have been northing for four years. they will be included in the hollywood costume exhibit. the slippers will head to london in the next two weeks. but they will be back on display at the smithsonian by thanksgiving. those are one ever my fav
be relevant to their daily lives. >> reporter: of course, there are first lady dressed as civil rights landmarks and a friendly frog, but there is a lot you may not know. >> and we operate for nasa can and we're on the edge of understanding the basis of dark matter, discovering new planets. >> reporter: whether you a kindergartener or a ph.d candidate, they hope you will find something useful at a new website and that is at seriouslyamazing.com. >> and they are living their lives online and integrated with the way they live every day. >> reporter: they hope you that will agree that it's seriously amazing. in washington, beth parker, fox 5 news. >>> a magical artifact in the smithsonian's museum will be on the move. the ones actress judy garland wore in the wizard of oz are being loaned to the albert museum in london. officials have been negotiating with smithsonian officials for four years to get the slippers. it was not easy and they wanted to include them in the hollywood costume exhibit. they will next head to london the next few weeks. >> we will take them from here beautifully pac
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
for the new term -- expected to be, civil rights. >>> plus kobe bryant, dropping a little insight on what it's like to play pick-up with the president. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. my brother doesn't look like a heart attack patient. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i'm a fighter and now i don't have that fear. i'm a fighter you're not just looking for a by house. eyes you're looking for a place for your life to happen. want my recipe for healthier hair color? natural instincts! formulated with aloe, vitamin and antioxidants natural instincts has a system that's a healthier way to radiant color. indulge... with natural instincts. less guilt, more gorgeous. bori
how african- americans were able to drive legislations in the civil-rights movement and say as a blueprint, let's take the amount of resources we have and you put that with voting and you have a different result. >> we me to go back to that same model and make sure we implement that in this next term. >> if anybody could jump in and answer this, and that is, let's say you go through november, let's say president, democrats, 50% holds up. 90% of black folks hold up. are you going to see african- americans and hispanics make it clear that they have to have an inside and outside game, and that is you have folks on the inside who say we are working with you, but then the extra forces on the outside who are also pushing as well to get what you want, and otherwise be risks folks saying let's don't have an extra row game, all of you are left with is an internal dane, and we can ignore it. that is a danger when it comes to getting what you want. >> i think every time you put all your eggs in one basket there's a danger they will get broken. i disagree that is what happened. the last
they say it vital their civil rights and causing outrage on both sides. >> having to put a sign on your door on halloween is like branding somebody. so when it's a scarlet letter or it's a yellow star of david for the nazi germany, you know, it's something that distinguishes everybody and actually makes them an outcast in their own community. >> i think it's a reasonable ordinance that the city has passed to help protect and keep us a safe city. >> gretchen: giving us the take is the host of "justice," judge jeanine pirro. all right. so i'm a parent. he's a parent, you're a parent. if you go out trick or troating with your kids, you night want to know if you're going to the house of a sex offender. >> you're right. the first obligation of government is protection of its citizens. as i listened to that attorney say it's like branding them, first of all, you can't even compare a predator pedophile to someone who is a victim of a holocaust. but let's get past that. they say it's a violation of their civil rights, first and 14th amendments, protected speech. that's hogwash. here is the bott
line higher education, business officials, civil rights groups that allied support for the use of race and the university of texas, swamp the number of briefs that are in opposition, but if you look at the broader public opinion, it appears that only about one-quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, you will see in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is quite broad support among the very same set of voters for preferences in college admissions based upon income. now, given these it is not surprising that we -- lord -- ward connerly has been extremely successful in his effort to ban affirmative action based upon race in a number of states. so far, those efforts are five other six times voters, when given the option has said we should end racial consideration in college admissions and public employment. including blues states. the second major problem facing affirmative-action is the legal issue by -- which will be joined in the fisher case. many people expect the u.s. supreme court is going to occu
laws because it opens businesses up to frivolous lawsuits, because we already have civil rights legislation to take care of anti-discrimination law. they don't usually come out and say it's about freedom, it's a business's right to pay women less for equal work. romney may not support todd akin but we should ask him hough he feels about this legislation that todd akin, if he's elected, will be voting on. >> this is one race the republicans early on are expected to win. john cornyn saying he doesn't think it's winnable. can akin win this race? >> i think it's possible. missouri is one of the only swing states that mccain still polled out last time when he lost ohio and other places. there's been a lot of improvement in the polls but neither candidate has ever moved very far past 50%. so that tells you that even with everything jamming up the system, this is a close race. >> but he apologized once for his remark about women, legitimate rape. and now he has come out of -- saying employers shouldn't have to pay women the same money in the workplace. >> so often the defense is -- we
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
states and this showdown in michigan to the civil rights movement. she says she is doing everything she can to get people to support prop 2. >> hey, are you a registered voter? do you know about this initiative? do you have a car? do you need a ride to the polls? i'm just excited because this is like that american fight, like they were fighting in the '60s. >> reporter: terry bowman is just as passionate. he's worked for ford at this parts plant outside detroit for 16 years. he's a member of the united auto workers union, but he thinks giving unions more power by changing the state constitution is a bad idea. especially in a state with high unemployment that's trying to attract newbusinesses. >> no corporation's going to want to come to michigan. it's going to guarantee an adverse aerial relationship right from the minute they come into the state. >> vote yes. >> reporter: both sides are getting support from outside the state, flooding the airways with commercials. >> don't let them hijack our constitution. >> reporter: dawson bell has been covering michigan politics for the "detroit fr
. >> he takes legislation that wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill and in an in tant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very, very, very much. >> chris: last week, caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall and made clear he made johnson come alive for many reader. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look at what he is doing now. >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power but as we turn to the final book he is writing now, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams that are the destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish this last book? >> well, sure. but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four years but why would you believe me?
weekly standard" would agree. when we look at civil rights, it should be not about the quality of results. it might reflect that there is a republican primary going on, or it might reflect the fact that they are failing the same journalistic standards. i think this varies over time. that is just a false logic. i do not know that it is 3 to 1, and i do not know the time you're talking about. some of that is republicans criticizing other republicans. it is certainly not three to one on our side. other questions? we have two here, if we can get the microphone over to the table in front of the cameras. i am keeping her hopping here. >> i am michael, and given what we have just heard about people choosing to believe their side or their candidate or their team of people that believe they are objective journalists, and i count myself among them, and i do not believe that many voters believe that being a liar is a disqualifying traits. what are you guys seeing? what can happen on the ground because of fact checking? >> kathleen alluded to this earlier. there is some modification in behavior. i ha
. >> but i think that the issue is, before my time, e eliberal republicans that stood up for civil rights in the '60s, where are those voices in the republican party it today saying i don't agree with a lot of the things, economic policies but democracy should be nonnegotiable. >> where you know what, this gets to a larger issue. where is the leadership, where is the courage within the republican party. i mean we were talking about this at the time of the birther nonsense, where were the grownups and the republican parties saying to its own members look, you are not only questioning the legitimacy of president obama, but you're questioning the legitimacy of the president of the united states. based on nothing. based on a lie and based on a racist lie and not one person would step forward, any kind of stature within the republican party and say enough. to your point, there's no outrage over this because, you know, quite frankly i think the republican leadership is being held hostage by sort of the last gapses of the far right wing. >> the fear based decision making. >> and shouldn't mitt r
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)

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